One of the coolest things about powershell is being able to customize the shell. Here’s what my shell looks like now.

powershell.prompt

When I’m working on a project using git, my prompt looks like this.

powershell.prompt.git

It now tells me what branch i am on. Whoa… All I had to do was drop a modified version of profile.ps1 into “c:\users\mo\documents\WindowsPowerShell”. If the “WindowsPowerShell” folder doesn’t exist, then create it. That’s what I did. This is also using posh-git. If you checkout the source you’ll find an example of the profile.ps1 that you can use.

Leveraging this file you can load other scripts every time you pop open a powershell. Like if you wanted to load a sweet twitter script. Here’s my current script…

Import-Module d:/scripts/posh-git/posh-git
d:\scripts\twitter-on-powershell\twitter-on-powershell.ps1
d:\scripts\vsvars2010.ps1

function prompt {
    $user_location = $env:username + '@' + [System.Environment]::MachineName + ' /' + ([string]$pwd).replace('\', '/').replace(':', '').tolower() + ' ~'
    $host.UI.RawUi.WindowTitle = $pwd
    Write-Host($user_location) -foregroundcolor green
    # Git Prompt
    $Global:GitStatus = Get-GitStatus
    Write-GitStatus $GitStatus
    return "> "
}

if(-not (Test-Path Function:\DefaultTabExpansion)) {
    Rename-Item Function:\TabExpansion DefaultTabExpansion
}

function TabExpansion($line, $lastWord) {
    $lastBlock = [regex]::Split($line, '[|;]')[-1]
    switch -regex ($lastBlock) {
        # Execute git tab completion for all git-related commands
        'git (.*)' { GitTabExpansion $lastBlock }
        # Fall back on existing tab expansion
        default { DefaultTabExpansion $line $lastWord }
    }
}

Enable-GitColors

The cool part is that everything you write in a powershell console can be dropped right in to a .ps1 file and run as a script. I’m actively learning…

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