I was recently listening to an episode of the ALT.NET podcast with guests Jeremy Miller, David Laribee, and Chad Myers. I remember Chad saying something to the effect of being slightly embarrassed of the code that Jeremy was about to step in to. I realized that I felt the same way...

I remember last year when I was just jumping into this .NET game. I had nothing to hide, I wanted people to review my work. I wanted feedback, I wanted guidance and I really worked hard to get feedback from people that I respected.

Today, I feel more like Chad! I feel a little more defensive about the stuff that I've written. I'm more nervous about having to explain design decisions made months ago, that I don't agree with today. I'm apologetic for making choices and writing some of the code that I've written. *sigh* (The overuse of the word I, probably hides the fact that yes I am part of an agile team and a lot of the decisions were made as a team or at least in pairs.)

Kshitij reminded me of a quote from Robin Sharma. I don't remember the exact quote but to paraphrase its along the lines of...

"If the cup is full, it will spill if you try to fill it. You must empty the cup in order to re-fill it!"

The reason that I think this quote applies is because I now realize that if I we choose to be to proud to accept criticism now, then I'm we're likely to be stuck in my our ways. The work that I've we've done, was a reflection of my our abilities at the time I was we were doing it, and not a reflection of who I am we are today.

Have you ever experienced that feeling of when you bring someone new in to a team, and you subconsciously wonder how they're going to upset the balance of the team. Are they going to find the dirty skeletons in your code closet and expose you. Or are they going to go with the flow, and just accept the way things are and keep on keepin' on!?

I think that I'm trying to form a post from all these random ideas, but the point I'm trying so hard to make is don't be embarrassed of your skill set. If we were all super heroes, then we wouldn't have any!

"The ghetto, let go. It's not a novelty, you can love your neighborhood, without loving poverty." - KRS ONE

You can keep that love for software, using alternative methods...

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