I just finished reading the five secrets you must discover before you die

Some quotes that I thought were interesting.

My grandfather, who, as I have said, was one of the wise elders in my life, used to talk about having a “good tired” at the end of a given day. He contrasted this with a “bad tired.” He told me that a “good tired” was when you lived your life focusing on the things that really mattered to you. A “bad tired” he said often comes even when it looks like we are winning, but we realize that we are not being true to ourselves. It seems to me that the first element of knowing ourselves is figuring out what makes up a “good tired” day for us.

Socrates said that the unexamined life is not worth living. There is another way to phrase that: Unless you are continually examining your life to make sure it is on target, there is a very good change that you will wind up living someone else’s life, which means coming to the end of your life and realizing that you had followed a path that was not your own.

So many people keep saying someday they will follow their heart, be the person they want to be in the world. If there is something you need to do, get to it.

What I have noticed is that there are ten-minute funerals and there are ten-hour funerals. Some people live a life that touches so many people in a positive way that people just want to hand around and talk about that person’s life. Other people live a more self-focused life and this does not happen.

When I was young, it was all about getting the part. But as you get older, you realize that there is little true joy in getting paid to pretend you are ecstatic over a cup of coffee; you want to know your work mattered.

… > The happiest people were those who knew they had left things better > than they had found them in some small way, whether in the form of > children who were contributing, the small advancement of a cause, or > leaving their impact on a small group of people.

What we hold in our awareness we move toward naturally.

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